Weekly Newsletter

Category Archives: Newsletters

* Head’s Note

Thank you all for participating and helping to create such an enjoyable and inspiring Family Arts Night last Friday. It was terrific to see so many families gathered to partake in this rich slice of our school’s culture. We have much to celebrate as a community, and the arts are a fantastic way to express who we are and what is important. As Richard Dreyfuss said in the movie Mr. Holland’s Opus, “Playing music is supposed to be fun. It’s about heart, it’s about feelings, moving people, and something beautiful, and it’s not about notes on a page. I can teach you notes on a page; I can’t teach you that other stuff.”

Here’s a big thank-you to all those in our community who make “that other stuff” come to life.

* Head’s Note

Sometimes, in the heart of winter, it’s helpful to think about lengthening days and the warmer temperatures in the month ahead of us. Our summer program director, Heather Verheeck, and I have enjoyed thinking about the summer quite often over the last few months as we plan an exciting range of programs that will be offered on our campus from June 19 through August 18.

In addition to programs taught by our faculty and staff, we will offer partner programs with other organizations such as the Montshire, the Upper Valley Humane Society, AVA Art Gallery, the Upper Valley Music Center, and new this summer, the Upper Valley Trails Alliance and Circus Smirkus. Each of the nine weeks include one-week programs for students who are 3 to 5, 6 to 9, and 9 to 13 years old. All programs have an early drop off option and free aftercare available until 5:00 pm daily. But most importantly, the programs offer a great way for students to have enriching experiences over the summer while working with talented instructors and meeting new friends. This is a great way to introduce your friends and neighbors to Crossroads, so please help us spread the word! You can learn more about these programs and register by clicking here.

* Head’s Note

When you work in schools, it can be easy to feel that time goes by without growing any older. Year after year, most third graders are eight turning nine and most sixth graders are eleven turning twelve. But I was reminded recently that our current kindergarteners will be 89 in the year 2100 and suddenly, the 22nd century didn’t seem quite so far away!

There’s no doubt that the world will be a very different place then. And it is our hope that many of our current students will help shape positive changes in our world during the remainder of this century.

* Head’s Note

One of my childhood friends successfully started a dot-com in Silicon Valley. He built a very successful company with smart, motivated, and talented employees. But he was not altogether happy with everyone he’s hired. “What are they lacking?” I asked when I saw him last summer. He replied that it boiled down to one deficiency: “They don’t ask enough questions.”

My, how things have changed! When my father started a business in southern NH in the 1950s, he used to say it was sufficient for his employees to show up every day and do their jobs, often performing the same set of responsibilities year after year. If they had a question about how to do something, they were responsible for trying to figure it out without bothering management. But now, more business leaders want people on their team who are persistently inquisitive, including those who can ask, “Why am I doing my job in this particular way?” or even more importantly, “Is there a better way to do it?”

* Head’s Note

I hope you all had a good holiday weekend and an enjoyable Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Though today the faculty is participating in workshops and engaging in a range of professional development opportunities, we look forward to our students’ return tomorrow and to a good remainder of the week. This is often the time of the year when classes enter a focused rhythm in their studies and students take so many exciting strides in their learning.

* Head’s Note

A colleague at my previous school once described a moment in his class when everything came together and his students understood complex concepts. When I asked him what made that class special, he simply said, “It flowed”. Though I wasn’t there at the time, I know what he meant. Over the decade that I was a classroom teacher in independent schools, I always cherished those moments–they reaffirmed my beliefs in teaching and the decision to work in schools.

Much of the current literature on happiness describes a flow state as one of the most deeply satisfying ones humans experience. When we are so immersed in an activity that all other concerns melt away, we gain important insights, make connections between what we do and what we care about, and may even lose track of the passage of time. It is not surprising that research also links flow to a greater expertise with your subject matter.

* Head’s Note

Happy 2017, everyone! This month, our students focus on our Core Virtue of courage. Beginning new things in a new year often requires tapping into a certain kind of valor with bravery and fortitude, particularly during times of political or social change. For those of us who work in schools, children often provide the inspiration for this virtue in part because they have to cope with so many physical and emotional changes in their own lives almost all of the time. Just think how much a kindergartner changes in one year, let alone the nine years he or she could be at Crossroads!

* Head’s Note

As we look ahead to the holidays and much-anticipated time with family and friends, I wanted to take a moment to thank all of you for helping our school have such a wonderful first half of the year. The Family Picnic, Back-to-School Night, Grandparents Day, and our twenty-fifth Anniversary celebration were all great successes and helped frame a very rewarding fall. With 135 students and a deeply committed faculty, staff, parents, and board, our school is in a great place, and there is a wave of optimism connected to achieving all that a school can and should be. Even in my short tenure here, I am proud of how far our school has come and excited by several initiatives now on the horizon. They include the renovation of our Barn, a new range of summer programs planned for 2017, and the continued consideration of innovations to our program as well as further improvements to our campus.

* Head’s Note

As I walk around Crossroads, I see many examples of this month’s Core Virtue: generosity. We are fortunate to be part of a community where people often share what they have without the expectation of a reward or the return of a favor. For teachers, this may take the form of helping others with classroom projects, covering responsibilities for colleagues, and assisting our common work in serving students. Students demonstrate their generosity through caring for their friends, completing service projects, and going above what is asked of them to help others in a variety of instances around the school.

* Head’s Note

Our Core Virtues this month focus on gratitude and stewardship. With Thanksgiving around the corner, these virtues are well-timed to coincide with a holiday best known for gathering family and friends to enjoy food and appreciate time together before transitioning into the winter months.

Of course, gratitude and stewardship are worthy virtues to pursue at all times of the year. Many recent studies also link these particular virtues to both happiness and longevity. From this perspective, gratitude and stewardship could be considered two of the healthiest of all the virtues, for while they encourage giving to others, they also benefit ourselves. As a friend of mine from Nepal once commented, “When you create a fire for others, the light from that flame also helps you find your way.”